De-extinction: Bringing animals of the past back to life – Københavns Universitet

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De-extinction: Bringing animals of the past back to life

Foredrag med Vin & Videnskab

TOM GILBERT (England) Professor in Palaeogenomics
BRITT WRAY (Canada) Author, science communicator

Foredraget vil være på engelsk.

Bringing animals of the past back to life is an idea that intrigues many. Recreating dinosaurs Jurassic Park-style will not happen any time soon, if ever, but when it comes to animals that became extinct more recently and that DNA is available from such as the woolly mammoth, the aurochs, the Tasmanian tiger, the quagga-zebra, and the passenger pigeon maybe in the not-too-far future it will be possible to revive them, or at least some version of them.

How far is science from being able to recreate extinct species? What are the challenges in reviving animals? And, not least, what ethical considerations does tinkering with life like that pose?

Professor in Palaeogenomics Tom Gilbert from the Natural History Museum of Denmark and science communicator Britt Wray, author of the book Rise of the Necrofauna: A Provocative Look at the Science, Ethics and Risks of De-Extinction, will take a look into the future of de-extinction.

A glass of wine will be served during the intermission.

Behind the speakers


TOM GILBERT Professor in Palaeogenomics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen. His research is based around applying the latest genome-sequencing tools to better understand the genetic basis of life. Has a BA in Biological Sciences from Oxford, a D.Phil in Zoology from Oxford, and undertook postdoctoral research in Arizona and Copenhagen, before becoming an Associate Professor in the Biological Institute at Copenhagen, then Professor at the Natural History Museum. Today his research aims at integrating genetic data from both small and large forms of life, to understand their adaptation, diversification and long term evolution.


BRITT WRAY Co-host of the BBC science podcast Tomorrow’s World, author of Rise of the Necrofauna: A Provocative Look at the Science, Ethics and Risks of De-Extinction, and PhD candidate at the Department of Media, Cognition & Communication at the University of Copenhagen where she studies science communication and synthetic biology. Holds a BSc in biology from Queen’s University and has been a Visiting Scholar at the Arthur L Carter Journalism Institute at New York University.